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PROGRAM:

NAME


cvs-inject - inject a debian source package into a CVS repository

SYNOPSIS


cvs-inject [options] <package>.dsc

DESCRIPTION


This manual page explains the Debian cvs-inject utility, which is used to inject or import
Debian source packages into a CVS repository. It handles Debian-only packages (which do
not have diff files) as well as normal packages from upstream sources converted to Debian
use.

The upstream sources are imported to the vendor branch and tagged
upstream_version_<upstream version> with all dots translated to under scores. The
debianized sources, if different, are put on the main branch, and tagged
debian_version_<upstream version>-<debian revision> with all dots translated to under
scores.

The sole argument is a debian source .dsc file, which is parsed to get the package name
and version. cvs-inject reads the same config file /etc/cvsdeb.conf as the the other
cvs-* utilities do. People may use of the dry-run option to inspect the steps this
utility takes.

Combined with the companion utilities cvs-buildpackage and cvs-upgrade, this provides an
infrastructure to facilitate the use of CVS by Debian maintainers. This allows one to keep
separate CVS branches of a package for stable, unstable, and possibly experimental
distributions, along with the other benefits of a version control system.

This utility can be used to generate a unified CVS source tree, for example, with

find /var/spool/mirror/debian/hamm/hamm/source \
-type f -name \*.dsc | while read i;
do
j=$(dirname $i | sed -e s:source/:: \
-e s:/var/spool/mirror/debian/:: )
cvs-inject -x$j $i
done

Which happily gobbled up the sources and created a CVS repository on my machine until the
partition filled up.

CAVEATS


Please note that the current behaviour of cvs-inject is to ignore files that match the
default list of file name patterns to be ignored (this is built into cvs); and that any
.cvsignore files in the upstream sources shall be honoured. This should be fine as long as
upstream sources do not include files that match cvs ignore patterns and yet should be in
the sources. The current list of ignored file name patterns is:
RCS SCCS CVS CVS.adm RCSLOG cvslog.* tags TAGS .make.state .nse_depinfo *~ #* .#*
,* _$* *$ *.old *.bak *.BAK *.orig *.rej .del-* *.a *.olb *.o *.obj *.so *.exe *.Z
*.elc *.ln core

If you wish to modify this behaviour, there are ways to do this (you should see CVS
documentation).

o) The per-repository list in `$CVSROOT/CVSROOT/cvsignore' is appended to the list, if
that file exists.

o) The per-user list in `.cvsignore' in your home directory is appended to the list,
if it exists.

o) Any entries in the environment variable $CVSIGNORE is appended to the list.

In any of the places listed above, a single exclamation mark (`!') clears the ignore
list. This can be used if you want to store any file which normally is ignored by CVS.
Also, any .cvsignore file found in the source directory is also honoured. If you wish to
specify your own list on the command line, you may use the environment variable
CVSDEB_IMPORTSUBSTMODE (for example, CVSDEB_IMPORTSUBSTMODE="! -I blah -ko -d ).

OPTIONS


-h Print out a usage message.

-m If present, this option directs this program to include the latest
debian changelog, if any, into the commit message. This overrides the
environment variable CVSDEB_USE_CHANGELOG

-M<module> The name of the CVS module. This argument overrides the settings in
the environment variable CVSDEB_MODULE. There is no corresponding
config file variable.

-F There are two things CVS may choke on symbolic links and CVS
directories in the source tree. Also, there are times when one may not
want to honour the upstream .cvsignore files. Without this option, the
cvs-inject program shall exit with an error message. This option
causes cvs-inject to ask whether you want to delete the offending
files. If you answer y, it removes them and continues; else it shall
exit with an error message. This argument overrides the settings in
the environment variable CVSDEB_FORCECLEAN, which in turn overrides
the setting in the configuration file, conf_forceclean.

-T<tag> The CVS tag to use for exporting sources, rather than constructing one
from the version. This assumes you know what you are doing.

-U<tag> The CVS tag to use for the upstream tag, rather than constructing one
from the upstream version. This assumes you know what you are doing.

-x<prefix> The name of the default CVS prefix (that is, this is appended to
CVSROOT when looking for the repository). This argument overrides the
settings in the environment variable CVSDEB_PREFIX, which in turn
overrides the setting in the configuration file, conf_prefix.

-R<root directory> Root of the original sources archive. If the cvs-buildpackage work
directory is set anywhere, (command line, configuration file,
environment variable), the root directory value is ignored, since we
only need the root directory to set defaults for the work directory.
This argument overrides the settings in the environment variable
CVSDEB_ROOTDIR, and the configuration file variable conf_rootdir.
Please note that the cvs-buildpackage work directory referred to here
is the scratch directory where this program works, not the directory
that the human uses to work in. This should probably not be a sub dir
of CVSROOT, since cvs shall refuse to export packages there, and the
script shall fail.

-W<work directory> The full path name for the cvs-buildpackage working directory.
Setting this variable overrides the settings for the root directory.
This argument also overrides the settings in the environment variable
CVSDEB_WORKDIR, and in the configuration file variable conf_workdir..
Please note that the cvs-buildpackage work directory referred to here
is the scratch directory where this program works, not the directory
that the human uses to work in, and needs to be the full (absolute)
path name. This should probably not be a sub dir of CVSROOT, since
cvs shall refuse to export packages there, and the script shall fail.
The default is /usr/local/src/Packages/

-d<number> Turn on debugging output. This lists the version numbers, the cvs-
buildpackage work and root directories, as well as the CVS tag used to
export the sources. This over-rides the DEBUG variable in the
configuration file.

-ctp Include package_ at the start of the CVS tag. This overrides the
CVSDEB_PACKAGEINTAG environment variable and the conf_forcetag
configuration file option. The default is not to include the prefix.

-n The no exec (or dry-run) option, causing cvs-inject to print out all
actions that would be taken without actually executing them..

-v Make the utility more verbose.

CVSDEB_IMPORTSUBSTMODE
You are also allowed to specify an environment variable,
CVSDEB_IMPORTSUBSTMODE, that overrides the default substitution option
of -ko. This is useful when you want to import a package that has a
bunch of binary files in the source tree (like emacs or rscheme).

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